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Airlie Beach

Airlie Beach Queensland

The mainland hub and platform to start an adventure in the Whitsundays.


At a Glance

Airlie Beach is the ultimate place to go before going out to visit the Whitsunday Islands. The tropical beach town itself is incredibly enjoyable and fun with clear waters in the lagoon that is perfect for relaxation. The amazing swimming lagoon was built by the local authority as a solution to the jellyfish infested sea.

The culture in Airlie Beach is distinct and laid-back. There are a variety range of cool funky cafes and alfresco dining locations around the lagoon. A perfect place for a romantic night with your loved one.


Airlie Beach
 
 



 

Where is Airlie Beach?

 

Airlie Beach is 1123 kilometres northwest of Brisbane.

Airlie Beach is located on a north-facing shore on the southern coast of the Whitsunday Region. It is facing north to the Pioneer Bay on the Pacific Ocean. The best way to get to Airlie Beach is to fly directly to Proserpine and then transfer via a shuttle service.


 

Things to see in Airlie Beach

 

Airlie Beach Lagoon

The lagoon is situated just a short stroll from the high street in Airlie Beach. It's the perfect spot for an afternoon swim with family or friends. It’s massive. It has a beach to sit on, a grassy area, picnic area, kids shallow end in the shade, Two pools connected by a swim under a bridge, a shallow non-beach area, a seat going around the entire pool. It’s just a great place.

Airlie Beach Lagoon

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

 

Bicentennial Walkway

Bicentennial Walkway is a fantastic easy walk along the shoreline. you can go just before dinner as the sun is setting and you can see the beautiful views of the whole way to Cannonvale. It happens to be the start of the walkway that meanders along the foreshore, past mangroves and parks, on a concrete path along to the marina, on to the boardwalk then onto the airlie township. All up took about 1hour casual walk. Very nice walk.

Bicentennial Walkway

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

 

Heart Reef

Heart Reef, in the Great Barrier Reef of the Whitsundays, is a stunning composition of coral that has naturally formed into the shape of a heart. Because of protected status, visitors are unable to snorkel or dive in Heart Reef. So, Heart Reef is best experienced from the air by helicopter or seaplane. Helicopter flight over the reef with the scenic view of the Heart reef. The view is breathtaking!!! It's like a trip to the paradise.

Heart Reef

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

 

Abell Point Marina

This Marina is constantly improving. Soon the large garden area will be finished. A beautiful spot to enjoy the Whitsunday views, then stroll along the Bicentennial Walkway to Shingley Beach or back toward Airlie Beach as there is a lovely little bay between the Marina and the Coral Sea Resort.

Abell Point Marina

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

 

 
 

What's the weather like?

 

Most of the locations in the Whitsundays experiences a subtropical climate where it is warm all year round with wet summers. The best time to visit the islands are undoubtedly August during the peak of the dry season. In Summer (December to February), the average maximum temperature is 30°C with an average minimum of 25°C. In Winter (June to August), the average maximum temperature is 24°C with an average minimum of 18°C.

 

Get to know Airlie Beach's history

 

Airlie Beach is a mainland hub and gateway in the Whitsunday Region.

The Whitsunday Islands were inhabited by the Aboriginal people of Australia prior to European arrival. These group of people were known as the Ngaro, and were known for being proficient navigators. The islands were first discovered by James Cook in 1770, who sailed through the islands and named the passage Whitsunday Passage. Among the first foreign settlers of the island are stranded sailors and wood cutters. The fertile and rich soil in the area made it attractive for pastoralists in subsequent years.

In the 1920s, tourism in the area was born as passengers began to visit these tropical islands after trading in the coastal towns. Eventually, these tourism ventures outgrew the original agricultural industry and a tourist boom ensued. Today, the area remain a popular tourist attractions, with entire islands mandated to be protected national parks to protect this spectacular place.