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Ayr

Ayr Queensland

The sugar producing capital of Australia located on the breathtaking Burdekin River.


At a Glance

Ayr was established as a settlement to facilitate the sugar industry in the 1800s. Today its heritage continues as the town remains one of the most productive sugarcane-growing area in the country. Owing to strategic placement, Ayr is a paradise for marine activities such as windsurfing, fishing and water skiing.

One notable landmark in Ayr is the Burdekin Bridge to the south which is also known as the ‘Silver Link’, constructed to prevent the town from being cut off by flood. The Silver Link is popular for once being the longest bridge in Australia.


Ayr
 
 


 

Where is Ayr?

 

Ayr is 1273 kilometres northwest of Brisbane.

Ayr is located inland near the delta where the Burdekin River meets the Pacific Oceans in Townsville North Queensland. It is to the south of Townsville on the highway. A popular fishing and swimming area is available a short drive east from Ayr. The best way to get to Ayr is to book a flight to Townsville and then drive there.


 

Things to see in Ayr

 

Yongala Dive

The SS Yongala sank in 1911 during a cyclone and wasn't "found" until 1958. During that time, it became an underwater oasis for sea life. Access from Yongala Dive at Alva Beach is the way to go. The crew were professional and very helpful, buddy pairing was excellent and the trip out an adventure in itself via 4WD and beach launch. Best of all the amazing range of fish, corals, sea snakes and rays of the wreck was incredible! It is a stunning experience for everyone.

Yongala Dive

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

 

Ayr Nature Display

The incredible and colourful arrangement of butterflies, moths, beetles, crabs, sea shells, reptiles, rocks, fossils and aboriginal stone implements. The display is a private collection of Allan and Jess Ey, beautifully arranged in glass display cabinets. This is a painstakingly incredible display, with both the array of objects and the intricate patterns they are presented in. Do yourself a favour and go visit. It is a real educational experience and something to marvel at.

Ayr Nature Display

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland/Matt Glastonbury

 

Alva Beach

Alva Beach is nearby of Ayr, offering miles of unspoilt sandy coastline and is a popular spot for beach fishing, birdwatching and windsurfing. It's also a close launching point for a dive tour to the world-famous dive wreck, the 'SS Yongala'. Yongala is Australia’s largest and most intact historic shipwreck and gives you the opportunity to come face to face with the charismatic mega marine life of the world heritage Great Barrier Reef Marine Park.

Alva Beach

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

 

Burdekin River Bridge

The spectacular Burdekin River Bridge is the district's best-known landmark and is the longest crossing of its type in the country. Known as the Silver Link, it is the only bridge in Australia built without a firm foothold. And, the Burdekin sits on a vast natural aquifer which is artificially replenished with water from the Burdekin River. A rich network of creeks and mangrove-lined estuaries make the area a mecca for fishing and crabbing. Don't miss it!

Burdekin River Bridge

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

 

 
 

What's the weather like?

 

Ayr has a tropical climate having two effective distinct seasons. Most rain occur during the humid summer months and the winters are relatively dry. In Summer (December to February), the average maximum temperature is 32°C with an average minimum of 23°C. In Winter (June to August), the average maximum temperature is 25°C with an average minimum of 13°C.

 

Get to know Ayr's history

 

Ayr is a rural town in the Burdekin district. The area became populated with settlers in the 1860s due to pastoral rush. Several plantations and mills were constructed in the area after settlers began to cultivate sugar in the fertile delta, a profitable venture that increased demand of land in the area. A community formed over time with schools, town halls and churches being built in the area which would ultimately become Ayr. The area was susceptible to cyclones and were struck several times in the past century, destroying infrastructure required for sustained growth.

Today, Ayr is home to approximately 8000 people. With the decline of the sugar industry, the town has pursued several other businesses to sustain their economy.