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Thargomindah

Thargomindah Queensland

The ‘frontier’ of far western Queensland, the last sign of civilisation before the endless desert outback.


At a Glance

Despite being on the fringe of human habitation in the area, Thargomindah is a relatively modern and peaceful country town in western Queensland. It is near to the crossroad of 3 Australian states and thus is a perfect stopping point when touring from Queensland.

A popular attraction near Thargomindah is the Burke and Wills ‘Dig Tree’ which tells a sad story of the demise of a few explorers. It was at this tree that food was buried by members of a depot who also marked the words ‘Dig’ on the tree. Another attraction is the Cameron Corner, where the three states meet. An interesting annual event at the Cameron Corner is New Year's Eve, which the locality allegedly celebrates three times each year as all three states have different timezones.


Thargomindah
 
 


 

Where is Thargomindah?

 

Thargomindah is 1004 kilometres west of Brisbane.

Thargomindah is located at the fringes of Outback Queensland near the border between Queensland, New South Wales and South Australia. It is mostly surrounded by bushlands. The Lake Bindegolly National Park is located a short drive east from Thargomindah. The fastest way to get to Thargomindah is via a plane flight from Brisbane.


 

Things to see in Thargomindah

 

Burke and Wills Tree

Seeds from a Waddi Tree found in the diary of Wills verify their passage through the Birdsville region. The Burke and Wills Tree is located approximately three kilometres from Birdsville and is said to mark one of their final campsites before they reached the Innamincka area, where the famous Dig Tree stands.

Burke and Wills Tree

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

 

Lake Bindegolly

Gnarled wattles standing above a low shrub layer break the burnt orange slopes leading down to a series of glistening lakes. Lake Bindegolly National Park conserves one of the most important wetland systems. A string of lakes—Bindegolly, Toomaroo and Hutchinson—are found in Lake Bindegolly National Park. Several unnamed freshwater lakes are also found on private property to the south of the park.

Lake Bindegolly

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland/Reichlyn Aguilar

 

Kilcowera Station

Visiting an Outback cattle station wouldn’t be complete unless you do a tour or two of the property. Sit back and relax while guide tours will takes you on a guided tour or set off yourself on a self drive exploration of Kilcowera and see its diverse range of wildlife, land types and vegetation communities.

Kilcowera Station

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

 

Artesian Bore

Thargomindah was the third town in the world, and the first in Australia that has a hydro-electric power system powering its street lights as far back to 1898. This was achieved by installing generators that took advantage of the natural water pressure in the Artesian Bore. Although the power source of the town have changed since then, the Artesian Bore still exists and provides water to the town.

Artesian Bore

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

 

 
 

What's the weather like?

 

Thargomindah lies in the hot semi-arid part of the Outback, experiencing very little rainfall even during wet seasons. In Summer (December to February), the average maximum temperature is 37°C with an average minimum of 23°C. In Winter (June to August), the average maximum temperature is 21°C with an average minimum of 7°C.

 

Get to know Thargomindah's history

 

Thargomindah was first settled in the 1860s as the administrative centre of the pastoral district. It was one of the first Australian town to produce hydroelectric power in the early 20th century. Presently, Thargomindah is home to about 300 people.