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Outback

Outback Queensland

A place where nature truly triumphs and rules, home to many of Australia’s wildlife species.


At a Glance

The Outback, despite its extreme conditions and being considered inhospitable for human living, is one of Australia’s major tourist attraction. It is so iconic that when one think of Australia, they picture the Outback. The national tourism webpage also writes that ‘Nothing says Australia quite like our Outback’, acknowledging the importance of the Outback to the country.

Despite being mostly unpopulated, there are several hub of human population in the Queensland Outback such as Mount Isa. These places are mostly populated with very specific reasons in mind, one such reason is the discovery of mining deposit in the surrounding area.


Outback
 
 


 

Where is Outback?

 

The Outback Queensland stretches from approximately 1000 kilometres west of Brisbane up north. The best way to navigate the outbacks is to get terrain-proof off-road vehicles.


 

Things to see in Outback

 

Wilpena Pound

The Wilpena Pound Campground has 40 powered campsites suitable for caravans, campervans, camper-trailers and tents, as well as over 300 unpowered bush campsites. The campground has three amenities blocks, two with laundry facilities, a pay phone, and is close to the general store selling groceries, petrol and firewood.The adjacent Visitor Information Centre books local tours and scenic flights over Wilpena Pound and the Ikara Flinders Ranges.

 

Thomson River

The Thompson River is located approximately four and a half kilometres north west of Longreach along the Landsborough Highway heading to Winton. While offering perfect camping spots along its banks, walking tracks and a 'beach', the river is also home to a number of species of fish, turtles and yabbies.

Thomson River

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

 

Lawn Hill Gorge National Park

The Waanyi Aboriginal people welcome you to their country and ask that you respect their special place. Boodjamulla (Lawn Hill) National Park is one of Queensland's most scenic national parks. Situated within the remote north-west highlands of Queensland, the park features spectacular gorge country, sandstone ranges and World Heritage fossils.

Lawn Hill Gorge National Park

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

 

Mount Isa

Within the endless stretches of the Outback lies Mount Isa, the major tourism facility in Outback Queensland. Here you can find many places to visit and things to do, for example, you can visit the Hard Times Mine Underground Tour, Isa Experience and Outback Park, the Mount Isa Regional Art Gallery, Riversleigh Fossil Centre, Mount Isa Fish Hatchery Project and the Outback Cafe. There are extensive creative landscapes in the Outback Park, with a central lagoon surrounded by lush native plants and a monumental waterfall.

Mount Isa

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

 

 
 

What's the weather like?

 

Due to the vastness of the Outback, specific climate and temperature estimate cannot be made. However, a generalisation of the outback climate is available. The Outback is mostly desert with extreme temperature variation where summers can be scorching hot and winters can be freezing cold. The occurrence and volume of rain is hard to determine as they can vary greatly year to year. In Summer (December to February), the average maximum temperature is 37°C with an average minimum of 24°C. In Winter (June to August), the average maximum temperature is 22°C with an average minimum of 4°C.

 

Get to know Outback's history

 

The Outback were mostly inhabited by Indigenous Australians. Due to its extreme climate and inaccessibility, not many attempts were made in exploring the Outback. While human habitation is possible, it is exceedingly difficult, resulting in sparse population in the area. The Queensland Outback are mostly inhabited by pastoralists.