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Mackay

Mackay Queensland

The urban hub of a paradise for nature lovers. A gateway to visit beaches, rainforests as well as the Great Barrier Reef Islands.


At a Glance

Mackay City, located on the bank of a blue river, features a really relaxing and modern lifestyle. Mackay is dotted with artistic and impressive buildings that were built and preserved in the 30s. The streets in the heart of the city is also lined with iconic palm trees, giving the city a refreshing sight. The city also has great views of the ocean, the marina is where you can see numerous luxurious yachts floating and swaying gently in the harbour. Near the marina is an elevated lookout that allows you to grasp the wonderful view of the area as well as the Great Barrier Reef Islands.

There are many things that one can do in Mackay. You can walk along the banks of the beautiful Pioneer River, taking breaks in one of the cute cafes by the river. You can also admire the sight and smell of Australian flowers and plants in the Mackay Regional Botanic Gardens. The Lamberts Beach is also a great location with shades and playgrounds for families to have picnics.


Mackay
 
 


 

Where is Mackay?

 

Mackay is 972 kilometres north of Brisbane.

Mackay is a coastal city located at the mouth of the Pioneer River at the eastern end of the Mackay region. The city itself is split into a northern and a southern portion by the river with three main bridges linking the two portion. The best way to get to Mackay is via a flight from Brisbane.


 

Things to see in Mackay

 

Great Barrier Reef

The Great Barrier Reef is one of the seven wonders of the natural world, and pulling away from it, and viewing it from a greater distance, you can understand why. It is larger than the Great Wall of China and the only living thing on earth visible from space and we have an abundance marine life and comprises of over 2,000 individual reef systems and coral cays. It is the natural beauty, and become one of the most sought after tourist destination.

Great Barrier Reef

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

Eungella National Park

High above the surrounding plains, this mist-shrouded and forest-clad mountain refuge is one of Queensland’s most ecologically diverse parks with 860 plant species and a wonderful variety of wildlife. Turn off the Bruce Highway 91km south of Proserpine and drive 9km to Marian. Continue 62km to the park.

Eungella National Park

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

 

Mackay Regional Botanic Gardens

The Mackay Regional Botanic Gardens showcases the flora of the Central Queensland Coast Bioregion, a diverse area featuring lush tropical rainforests, wide sweeping beaches, mangrove lined waterways and open eucalypt forests. Many plants have a unique natural features of the region are interpreted an area and have diverse cultural heritage and makeup mackay to celebrate the garden.

Mackay Regional Botanic Gardens

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland/Brooke Miles

 

Bluewater Lagoon

Comprising three tiered lagoons, the Bluewater Lagoon is a free family-friendly leisure facility overlooking the picturesque Pioneer River in the heart of Mackay's city centre. Covering an area equivalent to three 50 metre swimming pools, Bluewater Lagoon provides a safe all-round stinger-free swimming environment.

Bluewater Lagoon

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

 

 
 

What's the weather like?

 

Mackay has a tropical and humid climate. Summers are generally hot and wet while the winter is warm and dry. The area is susceptible to tropical cyclones and has seen a high level of tropical cyclones passing nearby in the last century. In Summer (December to February), the average maximum temperature is 30°C with an average minimum of 22°C. In Winter (June to August), the average maximum temperature is 23°C with an average minimum of 12°C.

 

Get to know Mackay's history

 

The original inhabitants of the Mackay region was the Yuibera people. Captain James Cook passed through the area in 1770, naming several landmarks such as Cape Palmerston and Cape Hillsborough. The area was first pioneered by John Mackay who led an expedition to Pioneer Valley in search of good pastoral land. The nearby river, presently Pioneer River, was proposed to be named Mackay River after John’s father. However, it was renamed in 1862 to be Pioneer River after the ship HMS Pioneer that brought Queensland Governor George Bowen to the area. The area later became known as the sugar capital of Australia as it totals a third of Australia’s sugar cane output.