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Moreton Bay

Moreton Bay Queensland

A thriving bay near Brisbane and the capital of watersports in the area. A perfect getaway location facing the vast Pacific Ocean.


At a Glance

Moreton Bay is widely considered to be one of the most important coastal resources in Queensland as it supplies abundant seafood for consumption and sand for construction projects. There are numerous sandbanks dotted around the bay, giving it a picturesque aerial view. There are also several islands on the bay, there is the Moreton Island, the Bribie Island and the Stradbroke Islands to name a few.

Moreton Bay’s natural heritage is well protected, with optimal terrains and waterways that is the habitat of a diverse range of species. Moreton Bay supports up to a quarter of all Australian bird species seasonally, making it a paradise for bird enthusiasts. Marine life such as dugongs, sharks and whales are also in abundance here, making cruises a very attractive option.


Moreton Bay
 
 


 

Where is Moreton Bay?

 

Moreton Bay is 14 kilometres north of Brisbane.

The Moreton Bay is on the south-east coast of Australia's Brisbane tourist region. It is one of the fastest developing places in Australia. Moreton Bay is also one of the most diverse areas of South East Queensland. The popular hotspots include Samford, Arana Hills, Redcliffe, Bribie Island, Caboolture, Dayboro, Woodford and Mt Mee. Moreton Bay region is just a 40 minute from Brisbane's city, hence, visitor can hire a car from the airport or take public transport.


 

Things to see in Moreton Bay

 

Glass House Mountains National Park

These eleven gorgeous craggy peaks that tower above the surrounding landscape are so significant that they are listed on the Queensland and the National Heritage Register as a landscape of national significance. There are walking tracks that lead through open forests to lookouts offering panoramic views of the magnificent landscape. There are challenging summit routes and opportunities for abseiling and rock climbing. You'll also find the incredible Australia Zoo, founded by the famed "Crocodile Hunter", Steve Irwin, and his family in the region.

Glass House Mountains National Park

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

 

D’Aguilar National Park

Discover remote gorges, sheltered pockets of subtropical rainforest, expanses of eucalypt woodland and spectacular views here near Moreton Bay, all within an hour and a half's drive of Brisbane. D'Aguilar National Park (formerly Brisbane Forest Park) totals approximately 36,000ha, protecting the core of the D'Aguilar Range’s vast bushland area. The park is striking in its diversity of environments and plant communities. Take a journey through open eucalypt woodlands, scribbly gum forests and lush subtropical rainforests.

D’Aguilar National Park

Image Courtesy Matthew Taylor/Tourism and Events Queensland

 

Bribie Island Seaside Museum

The Bribie Island Seaside Museum is a small museum with exhibitions that brings the past back for the contemporary eyes. Here you will discover the history of the birth of modern seaside tourism. The museum also showcases Matthew Flinders’ encounter with the Aboriginal people at Skirmish Point, the American Troop occupation in World War Two, as well as stories of Bribie and the people who shaped the island’s history.

 

Whale Watching

During migration season, majestic humpback whales swing by South East Queensland on their 10,000km trek to the warm, tropical water up north. Giving you a chance to get up close and personal to these majestic creatures between June and November. Of all the great whales, the Humpback is the most surface active, displaying behaviour that will not only inspire you but leave you in awe. There is clearly no better place to observe the mighty Humpback Whale than Brisbane’s Moreton Bay, recognised as one of the world’s best whale watching destinations.

Whale Watching

Image Courtesy Tourism And Events Queensland

 

 
 

What's the weather like?

 

Moreton Bay has a subtropical climate, optimal for visitors that enjoy the outdoors. Moreton Bay receives a substantial amount of sunshine and is generally dry during the winters and wet during the summer, seeing rain and storms. In Summer (December to February), the average maximum temperature is 29°C with an average minimum of 21°C. In Winter (June to August), the average maximum temperature is 21°C with an average minimum of 8°C

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Get to know Moreton Bay's history

 

Moreton Bay was originally named by James Cook as ‘Morton’s Bay’, a subsequent spelling error in Cook’s account has culminated in the current name. It was an oft-used shipping route in the area and was settled in 1825. Accounts of conflicts between indigenous people and European settlers existed in its early days. The population in the area grew as immigrant ships from England and Scotland arrived in the area. Moreton Bay became a shipping channel for the timber industry.

Today, Moreton Bay is a popular destination for anglers and an important coastal resource in Queensland.